people surrounded aid trucks as they attempted to cross the border from Colombia into Venezuela

President Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela has been in a standoff for weeks with political opponents, who question the legitimacy of his election to a second term in office.

That standoff has reached a head with a disagreement over whether to allow tons of humanitarian aid, donated mostly by the United States, into Venezuela across the Colombian border.

Mr. Maduro has refused the aid. But his opponents — led by Juan Guaidó, who drew international support when he declared himself Venezuela’s interim president last month — have vowed to forcibly bring in the supplies on Saturday. Getting the aid in would be a symbolic victory for the opposition, and signal Mr. Maduro’s loosening grip on power. By noon, aid trucks were being positioned at the Colombian border. One small truck also managed to cross the border from Brazil with supplies.

The aid, including food and medicine, is desperately needed in Venezuela, where conditions have grown steadily worse in recent months. Inflation has skyrocketed, hunger is endemic, and hospitals are without medicine. More than three million people have fled the country, many on foot, sparking a regional migration crisis.
(Folha)

people surrounded aid trucks as they attempted to cross the border from Colombia into Venezuela

people surrounded aid trucks as they attempted to cross the border from Colombia into Venezuela

President Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela has been in a standoff for weeks with political opponents, who question the legitimacy of his election to a second term in office.

That standoff has reached a head with a disagreement over whether to allow tons of humanitarian aid, donated mostly by the United States, into Venezuela across the Colombian border.

Mr. Maduro has refused the aid. But his opponents — led by Juan Guaidó, who drew international support when he declared himself Venezuela’s interim president last month — have vowed to forcibly bring in the supplies on Saturday. Getting the aid in would be a symbolic victory for the opposition, and signal Mr. Maduro’s loosening grip on power. By noon, aid trucks were being positioned at the Colombian border. One small truck also managed to cross the border from Brazil with supplies.

The aid, including food and medicine, is desperately needed in Venezuela, where conditions have grown steadily worse in recent months. Inflation has skyrocketed, hunger is endemic, and hospitals are without medicine. More than three million people have fled the country, many on foot, sparking a regional migration crisis.
(Folha)

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